PROGRAMME 2020/2021 Until further notice, all lectures will be delivered on-line and NOT at Barn Hill Church. Details will be sent to all members prior to these lectures. If you require further information please contact us at stamford@theartssociety.org Please keep checking back as the COVID19 restrictions change plans. December 8th 2020 Step into the Christmas Card Caroline Holmes The return of a popular lecturer with a timely theme for the end of the year. For the last 150 years Christmas cards have been adorned with nativity scenes or holly, ivy and mistletoe, a rotund Father Christmas, hosiery, trees, and to the shout of Noel, Noel. Sacred and profane, plant symbolism and carols that echo the sacred magic of the nativity scene, the lowing animals popularized by St Francis of Assisi, the shepherds and kings, all playing their part and foretelling the future. There are also fashion plates, New Year wishes and cartoons. So what on earth do Christmas cards portray – tasty, tasteful or tasteless? "First christmas card". Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Common January 12th 2021 Passionate Potters - from de Morgan to Leach Julian Richards William Morris led a revolution against the products of the machine age. The first of our ‘passionate potters’, William de Morgan, was a friend of Morris who rediscovered the secrets of Near Eastern lustre glazes. In contrast, the eccentric and argumentative Martin Brothers created a range of elaborate salt glazed pots unparalleled in their imaginative breadth. Sir Edmund Elton, the ‘potter baronet’, made pots which combine startling glazes with exotic forms. And finally, Bernard Leach, the father of English studio pottery, not only married the arts of Japan and England but created a legacy that is still alive today. This lecture explores the lives of these truly passionate potters and celebrates their extraordinary and beautiful creations. William De Morgan Evelyn De Morgan (1855–1919) National Portrait Gallery, London ArtUK Click here for more information on The De Morgan Foundation February 9th 2021 Tate Modern-much more than a pile of bricks Ian Swankie Tate Modern originally opened in 2000 but in June 2016 opened its doors to the stunning new Blavatnik Building immediately setting the new gold standard for museum design. This talk looks at the sleek new architecture and its engagement with the local environment and then follows the highlights of the collection, starting with Monet, Matisse and Picasso, continuing through the 20th century artists such as Bacon, Freud and Epstein and on to some international recent works. Some are easy to explain, and some are quite challenging. Some are profound, some are witty, some are whacky, but they all have a place. Tate Modern is the most visited modern art museum in the world and this armchair tour is a chance to explore the artworks without the crowds. Photo:Dickbauch2005 Click here for the Tate Modern web site March 9th 2021 Legends in Czech Glass Mark Hill The 1950s–70s saw a renaissance in Czech glass design that re- established the Bohemian region’s global reputation in this area. From behind the Iron Curtain, skilled designers pushed the boundaries of 20th century glass design and produced unique art glass masterpieces that went on to inspire visually stunning, highly innovative and commercial ranges. Despite this, the designers responsible were rarely named. Until today, the designs they produced have been typically forgotten or misattributed. This lecture reveals the work of seven influential designers across cut, blown and pressed glass, and considers the economic and political context that affected it. LEDVOA/Zoja Trofimiuk Click here for Mark’s own web site page on Czech Glass April 13th 2021 Vaux le Vicomte - Fit for a King. The inspiration behind Versailles Palace - a tale of misplaced ambition, jealousy and betrayal Carole Petipher French 17th century chateau design owes much to one man; the ambitious visionary Nicolas Fouquet who is still somewhat of an enigma today. He seemed invincible but made one grave error of judgement which was to lead to his downfall. He employed the country’s best talent of the day to commission a spectacular chateau for himself. In doing so he was completely outshining the Sun King; Vaux le Vicomte presented a radical new look for the century whilst Versailles was nothing more than a humble hunting lodge at the time. The story that ensues is legendary. Vaux le Vicomte - Visenya1995 May 11th 2021 A tour of Big Ben Tim Redmond Big Ben is one of the most iconic buildings in the world – it identifies the UK and democracy in the Western world. But there is a lot more to this tower than the beautiful external Gothic architecture; and Tim will prove this to you. Using stunning images, he will take you on a virtual tour of the interior, saving you the effort of climbing 334 spiral stairs. He will explain the historical background and discuss the friction between the often controversial personalities involved in the building and designing of the tower. Tim will then take you behind those magnificent clock faces; show and explain the workings of the enormous clock mechanism; before finally taking you into the belfry and presenting before you – Big Ben, the most famous bell in the world! After all that excitement Tim will ensure you safely descend the stairs ready for your well-earned cup of tea! Photo:Dietmar Rabich June 8th 2021 The Glory of Venice: 500 years of music and the arts Peter Medhurst With its huge variety of cultural influences from southern Italy, Northern Europe and from the East, Venice was designed by its inhabitants to be an exceptional place. Its music is exceptional too, and from 1550 to 1750 Venice was at the forefront of musical ideas in Europe. This lecture explores the music making at St Marks, the music of Venice's 17th century opera houses, and the important role played by the four Ospidali, which gave rise to the great concertos of Vivaldi and his contemporaries. The lecture/study day also looks at 19th and 20th century compositions that were premiered in Venice. September 14th 2021 Same Old, Same New Aliki Braine One might think that it is easy to spot the difference between contemporary and historical art, but what about what they have in common. Can old masters help us understand art works such as the infamous 'pile of bricks' or 'unmade bed'? This lecture explores whether the old masters can help us understand modern and contemporary works, and questions whether artists' intentions and strategies have really changed across the centuries. October 12th 2021 The Subtle Art of Fake News Geri Parlby No synopsis available November 9th (AGM at 10.30am) 2021 Cathedrals: safe places to do risky things Janet Gough This talk provides an overview of the Church of England's magnificent 42 cathedrals, jewels in the crown of England's built heritage, some recognised as World Heritage Sites. Beautifully illustrated by Country Life photographer, Paul Barker, in addition to looking at their history and stories, evolving architecture and treasures, the talk considers the role of cathedrals over the centuries and specifically their role today. December 14th 2021 Christmas with Giles, Grandma and Family Barry Venning For a great many members of The Arts Society, the cartoonist Carl Giles was as much a part of the festive season as the Christmas tree, crackers and the Queen's Speech. So popular were the Giles annuals as Christmas presents that they helped to make him Britain's best loved, most successful and wealthiest cartoonist. The talk looks at Giles's life and work with a particular emphasis on his seasonal cartoons, particularly those featuring Grandma and the Giles family. They include some of his funniest cartoons but, as the art historian William Feaver pointed out, they also demonstrate that he had few equals when it came to representing Britain in Winter.
Web site & mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training
PROGRAMME 2020 Until further notice, all lectures will be delivered on-line and NOT at Barn Hill Church. Details will be sent to all members prior to these lectures. If you require further information please contact us at stamford@theartssociety.org December 8th Step into the Christmas Card Caroline Holmes The return of a popular lecturer with a timely theme for the end of the year. For the last 150 years Christmas cards have been adorned with nativity scenes or holly, ivy and mistletoe, a rotund Father Christmas, hosiery, trees, and to the shout of Noel, Noel. Sacred and profane, plant symbolism and carols that echo the sacred magic of the nativity scene, the lowing animals popularized by St Francis of Assisi, the shepherds and kings, all playing their part and foretelling the future. There are also fashion plates, New Year wishes and cartoons. So what on earth do Christmas cards portray – tasty, tasteful or tasteless? "First christmas card". Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons January 12th 2021 Passionate Potters - from de Morgan to Leach Julian Richards William Morris led a revolution against the products of the machine age. The first of our ‘passionate potters’, William de Morgan, was a friend of Morris who rediscovered the secrets of Near Eastern lustre glazes. In contrast, the eccentric and argumentative Martin Brothers created a range of elaborate salt glazed pots unparalleled in their imaginative breadth. Sir Edmund Elton, the ‘potter baronet’, made pots which combine startling glazes with exotic forms. And finally, Bernard Leach, the father of English studio pottery, not only married the arts of Japan and England but created a legacy that is still alive today. This lecture explores the lives of these truly passionate potters and celebrates their extraordinary and beautiful creations. William De Morgan Evelyn De Morgan (1855–1919) National Portrait Gallery, London ArtUK Click here for more information on The De Morgan Foundation February 9th 2021 Tate Modern-much more than a pile of bricks Ian Swankie Tate Modern originally opened in 2000 but in June 2016 opened its doors to the stunning new Blavatnik Building immediately setting the new gold standard for museum design. This talk looks at the sleek new architecture and its engagement with the local environment and then follows the highlights of the collection, starting with Monet, Matisse and Picasso, continuing through the 20th century artists such as Bacon, Freud and Epstein and on to some international recent works. Some are easy to explain, and some are quite challenging. Some are profound, some are witty, some are whacky, but they all have a place. Tate Modern is the most visited modern art museum in the world and this armchair tour is a chance to explore the artworks without the crowds. Dickbauch2005 Click here for the Tate Modern web site March 9th 2021 Legends in Czech Glass Mark Hill The 1950s–70s saw a renaissance in Czech glass design that re- established the Bohemian region’s global reputation in this area. From behind the Iron Curtain, skilled designers pushed the boundaries of 20th century glass design and produced unique art glass masterpieces that went on to inspire visually stunning, highly innovative and commercial ranges. Despite this, the designers responsible were rarely named. Until today, the designs they produced have been typically forgotten or misattributed. This lecture reveals the work of seven influential designers across cut, blown and pressed glass, and considers the economic and political context that affected it. LEDVOA/Zoja Trofimiuk Click here for Mark’s own web site page on Czech Glass April 13th 2021 Vaux le Vicomte - Fit for a King. The inspiration behind Versailles Palace - a tale of misplaced ambition, jealousy and betrayal Carole Petipher French 17th century chateau design owes much to one man; the ambitious visionary Nicolas Fouquet who is still somewhat of an enigma today. He seemed invincible but made one grave error of judgement which was to lead to his downfall. He employed the country’s best talent of the day to commission a spectacular chateau for himself. In doing so he was completely outshining the Sun King; Vaux le Vicomte presented a radical new look for the century whilst Versailles was nothing more than a humble hunting lodge at the time. The story that ensues is legendary. Vaux le Vicomte - Visenya1995 May 11th 2021 A tour of Big Ben Tim Redmond Big Ben is one of the most iconic buildings in the world – it identifies the UK and democracy in the Western world. But there is a lot more to this tower than the beautiful external Gothic architecture; and Tim will prove this to you. Using stunning images, he will take you on a virtual tour of the interior, saving you the effort of climbing 334 spiral stairs. He will explain the historical background and discuss the friction between the often controversial personalities involved in the building and designing of the tower. Tim will then take you behind those magnificent clock faces; show and explain the workings of the enormous clock mechanism; before finally taking you into the belfry and presenting before you – Big Ben, the most famous bell in the world! After all that excitement Tim will ensure you safely descend the stairs ready for your well-earned cup of tea! Photo:Dietmar Rabich June 8th 2021 The Glory of Venice: 500 years of music and the arts Peter Medhurst With its huge variety of cultural influences from southern Italy, Northern Europe and from the East, Venice was designed by its inhabitants to be an exceptional place. Its music is exceptional too, and from 1550 to 1750 Venice was at the forefront of musical ideas in Europe. This lecture explores the music making at St Marks, the music of Venice's 17th century opera houses, and the important role played by the four Ospidali, which gave rise to the great concertos of Vivaldi and his contemporaries. The lecture/study day also looks at 19th and 20th century compositions that were premiered in Venice. September 14th 2021 Same Old, Same New Aliki Braine One might think that it is easy to spot the difference between contemporary and historical art, but what about what they have in common. Can old masters help us understand art works such as the infamous 'pile of bricks' or 'unmade bed'? This lecture explores whether the old masters can help us understand modern and contemporary works, and questions whether artists' intentions and strategies have really changed across the centuries. October 12th 2021 The Subtle Art of Fake News Geri Parlby No synopsis available November 9th (AGM at 10.30am) 2021 Cathedrals: safe places to do risky things Janet Gough This talk provides an overview of the Church of England's magnificent 42 cathedrals, jewels in the crown of England's built heritage, some recognised as World Heritage Sites. Beautifully illustrated by Country Life photographer, Paul Barker, in addition to looking at their history and stories, evolving architecture and treasures, the talk considers the role of cathedrals over the centuries and specifically their role today. December 14th 2021 Christmas with Giles, Grandma and Family Barry Venning For a great many members of The Arts Society, the cartoonist Carl Giles was as much a part of the festive season as the Christmas tree, crackers and the Queen's Speech. So popular were the Giles annuals as Christmas presents that they helped to make him Britain's best loved, most successful and wealthiest cartoonist. The talk looks at Giles's life and work with a particular emphasis on his seasonal cartoons, particularly those featuring Grandma and the Giles family. They include some of his funniest cartoons but, as the art historian William Feaver pointed out, they also demonstrate that he had few equals when it came to representing Britain in Winter.
Web site and mobile phone pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training